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Monthly Archives: May 2018

Rope-Jumping

Jumping rope has to be a vigorous sport, because you must spin the rope at least 80 times a minute to keep it from tangling. Most people use more energy when they jump rope than when they run. Jumping 80 times a minute uses the same amount of energy as running a mile in less than 8 minutes, a fairly rapid clip for most people. If you enjoy rope jumping, do it at a pace that is comfortable to you and stop when you feel discomfort.

To use rope-jumping for fitness, you need to be skilled enough to jump continuously for twenty to thirty minutes, and jumping that long and fast requires that you be in good shape. All you need is a ten-foot rope. The ends of the rope should barely reach your armpits when you stand on the middle of it. You don’t need special shoes, but sandals or loose shoes are likely to cause tripping.

Start out by spinning the rope forward so you can see it as it passes. Bend your knees to absorb the shock of landing and protect the force of your feet striking the ground. To keep yourself from falling, bend slightly forward at the waist. Start out gradually and work up to thirty minutes three times a week.

Exercise Lower Blood Pressure

The good news is that many studies have shown that a combination of exercise, stress reduction and a change in dietary habits can reduce that pressure as well as better than those drugs.

Now there’s even better news. A ground-breaking new study offers conclusive proof that just engaging in a regular exercise programme can drop your numbers enough to pretty much make those drugs unnecessary.

That’s all it took. The researchers started out with 27 overweight, out-of-shape men with mild hypertension, weaned them off any blood-pressure medications they were taking and broke them into two groups.

One group did the real exercise: a half-hour of “fast walking,” jogging and/or stationary cycling four times a week at 65 to 80 per cent of their maximum heart rate.

The men in the other group did a fake exercise. They did “slow calisthenics and stretching” for an equal amount of time, but their heart rate stayed below 60 per cent of the maximum.

Heart rate was carefully monitored in both groups of men so that the researchers could be certain the real exercisers were keeping theirs above 65 per cent and those doing the fake workout stayed below 60 per cent. (If they moved out of those ranges, an alarm sounded!) This “proof of exercise intensity” makes this study fairly unique.

At the end of 6 weeks, you could see a significant difference in the two groups. The men doing the real exercise had lowered their diastolic reading (the bottom one) by an average of more than 6 points.

At the end of 10 weeks, it was down almost 10 points; from an average of 94.8 to an average of 85.2. Those doing the fake workout saw their diastolic reading go up: from 93.7 to 94.4.

Systolic, the top reading, went down 6 points in the real exercisers from an average of 136.6 to 130.2. In the fake exercisers, it went up from 134.9 to 135.8.

Or, as the researchers put it, 9 out of 10 men in the real exercise group got their diastolic reading down to less than the magic 90. All of the men doing the fake exercises were 90 or higher.

As the researchers explain, previous studies about exercise’s effects on blood pressure have come up with all kinds of results. But this one has several edges.

The researchers monitored the men’s exercise levels like never before and insisted that they make no changes in their diet. They kept the weight and fat levels the same in both groups Why? Because some people had felt that such “confounding variables” as diet and weight loss were the cause of any drops in BP in earlier studies, and not the exercise itself.

The researchers might also be the first in medical history to include a group that did placebo exercises for comparison.

Enjoy Exercise

Never start exercise with too much stress, do it in a relaxed mood and environment. Exercise outdoors if you can and enjoy the nature. Listen to your favorite music, and enjoy while you exercise. While exercising outdoors use earphones and also be careful about what’s going around you. By listening to music or even listening to interesting books on tape will make your exercise more enjoyable. You can even exercise in front of the television by watching your favorite song or favorite programme.

Ask your friends to join your exercise program. Join a gym or a health club for a sport or recreational activity. When you join a gym or a social club you get to meet new people who could give you company and this makes your exercise more social and enjoyable.

After finishing a vigorous session reward yourself with a massage, sit in a whirlpool or sauna. Go out with your partner after the exercise session. Set goals and when you reach them, reward yourself.

Exercise and Diet

Muscles use a large amount of calories to keep themselves nourished. They eagerly await those calories that you are ingesting on a daily basis. It isn’t too difficult to hypothesize then that the more muscle you have, the more calories you burn. The most important aspect of this is that your muscles don’t have to be particularly working out in order to reap the benefits. A bulging Hulk will burn more calories by sitting down and watching TV then your average fat-bellied, couch potato. The reason again, more muscles equals more calorie burning, regardless of what state your body happens to be in.

The best muscles to work out are the ones in your large muscle groups. These include your legs, chest, back, and shoulders. These groups of muscle build up the biggest mass and in the shortest amount of time. An added benefit to working the larger muscles is that your metabolism kicks into high gear. So what exactly are the types of exercises you should be doing? There are 3 groups that you will need to focus on: Circuit Training, Compound Exercises, and High Intensity running.

Circuit training is in simple words, doing different exercises one after another with very little rest between exercises. By moving constantly and shortening your rest periods, circuit training keeps your heart rate up throughout your workout. This insures maximum fat burn and gives you a great cardiovascular fitness benefit. If you keep your rest to 30 seconds between exercises and 1 minute between circuits, the time needed to get a good overall workout is cut down drastically.

Compound exercises are exercises that work on multiple muscles with one exercise. These exercises not only make your workout more fun, but they also demand more out of your muscles. Remember, more muscle equals greater fat burning. Combine these types of exercises in circuit training and you will definitely keep your metabolism firing. You can start small, but make sure to make an effort to progress. Some good exercises to start out with are squats, bench press, triceps pushdown, lunges, leg curls, and biceps curls.

High intensity running is great to do in conjunction with the rest of your exercises, but try to do it on your off days from strength training. Remember my overweight friend? He was running too but the reason he failed is because he was always running at the same pace. Have you ever seen one of those marathon runners? Notice how they all seem to have a skinny frame. Now compare them to say a sprint runner. Who seems to have the bigger muscles? Sprint runners are always working on the intensity of their workouts since the demands they place on their body in such a short period of time exceed their counterparts. The majority of fat burning in intensity driven workouts is lost after the workout.